Jane Dunnewold {Podcast Episode #116}

When I decided to produce a surface design podcast series, Jane Dunnewold was a natural choice. Spanning a thirty year career, Jane has worked in various surface design medias, written several books including Complex Cloth: A Comprehensive Guide to Surface Design, Art Cloth: A Guide to Surface Design on Fabric and Creative Strength Training: Prompts, Exercises and Personal Stories for Encouraging Artistic Genius, is the Past President of the Surface Design Association, and founded the Surface Design Studio at the Southwest School of Art.

Pattern Dance by Jane Dunnewold as part of her Quilt/Not Quilt series

Living in San Antonio, Texas, she has her own teaching studio as well as works with her daughter on her Creative Strength Training courses. During our conversation, we talk about how personal challenges shape your work, the connection between psychology and creativity, how our work can be a reflection of our voice, and more. I hope you enjoy this episode.

Notes from the Show:

Michael James

Erica Wilson

Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert

Artists Way by Julia Cameron

Carol Soderlund

the McNay Museum

Quilt/Not Quilt Series by Jane Dunnewold

Spoonflower

Sponsors:

Today’s episode is sponsored by Dharma Trading Company. As a second generation customer of their company, I know they have all of your fabric printing, painting and dyeing bases covered. Serving the fiber artist community since 1969 with great prices and the best customer support in the industry, Dharma Trading is your source for textile art supplies.You can find them at dharmatrading.com or call toll free at 800-542-5227. Podcast Listeners can save 10% off their order with promo code Dharma10. The coupon expires September 1, 2017.

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Comments 2

  1. Worth the price of admission: hearing Jane say she too spent a career in uncertainty because she didn’t have a formal art education. I am in that same boat. I have a degree in nursing science, and a diploma in theology, and spent 25 years in credit, collections and financial planning/tax. My art-brain didn’t bubble up till I turned 50…so I am still a neophyte, still exploring and playing. The Voices (Jane’s “Committee”) are very strong, often. I have to work against “Who do you think you are?” So…I appreciate Jane’s perspective. I’m “old and female” and a quilter before I turned it into art….and I live in a rural area where quilts aren’t quilts unless they go on beds, and most art quilts are replicas made from patterns. Thank you for a dose of encouragement on a day when the Voices happen to be particularly bothersome! 🙂

  2. Hi Sandi,
    I wanted to let you know about the magic of your podcasts. I tend to do a lot of driving and also when I do creative work I listen to your blog. I am not focusing so much on sewing right now although listening to your podcasts I’m doing more of that. But I am a glass artist. I make beads using an oxygen propane torch and lately I make flowers. I am also learning about glass fusing. Anyway, I digress. I do wish there was a podcast for us but whatever. I was listening to your interview with Jane and decided to check her out. I went to her website and noticed that she was teaching a class in Mendocino, a small town in Northern California. The chances are pretty slim that this lady I was enamored with was teaching in my neck of the woods. I took that as a sign and signed up for the class. I loved Jane, loved the class and look forward to taking her creativity workshop on line. Thanks again so much.

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